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Relaxation Skills

Take Tim Out and Relax

Life can be overwhelming at times. No wonder we have a desire to escape "reality" through drugs and alcohol. Try practicing not taking things so seriously. It sounds ridiculous, especially when we are faced with all the troubles of this world. But even by taking 5 or 10 minutes out of your day to take some deep breaths and relax, life's problems may seem less intense. Sometimes it helps to watch a funny movie. Laughter can get you outside of yourself. Be kind to yourself. We are all in a journey.

Gratitude and Positive thinking

Depression is often experienced by those in addiction recovery. 
To combat this, try being grateful for even small things in your life.
Also, remind yourself of the good things you have experienced in your life.

Connection of Children to Nature Brings Less Distress, Hyperactivity and Behavioral Problems

City lifestyle has been criticized for being an important reason for children being disconnected from nature. This has led to an unhealthy lifestyle in regards to active play and eating habits. Even worse, many young children do not feel well psychologically – they are often stressed and depressed. 16 per cent of preschoolers in Hong Kong and up to 22% in China show signs of mental health problems.
Recent research shows that spending time in nature may bring many health benefits, and many environmental programs around the world are trying to decrease ‘nature-deficit’ and ‘child-nature disconnectedness’ in order to improve children’s health.

The Mind

The mind is like water. When it's turbulent, it's difficult to see. When it's calm, everything becomes clear.

Slow Down

During the holiday season we seem to be always in a rush to get things done. Try slowing down. If things don't get done, then they just don't get done. Try to enjoy each moment and let what will be, be.

It’s true – the sound of nature helps us relax

Researchers at BSMS found that playing ‘natural sounds’ affected the bodily systems that control the flight-or-fright and rest-digest autonomic nervous systems, with associated effects in the resting activity of the brain. While naturalistic sounds and ‘green’ environments have frequently been linked with promoting relaxation and wellbeing, until now there has been no scientific consensus as to how these effects come about. The study has been published in Scientific Reports.
The lead author, Dr Cassandra Gould van Praag said: “We are all familiar with the feeling of relaxation and ‘switching-off’ which comes from a walk in the countryside, and now we have evidence from the brain and the body which helps us understand this effect.