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Crystal Meth Addiction

Pulling Ourselves Out Of Issolation and Loneliness

Alone no more.
"We gradually and carefully pull ourselves out of the isolation and loneliness of addiction and into the mainstream of life."
Basic Text, p. 37
Many of us spent much of our using time alone, avoiding other people-especially people who were not using-at all costs. After years of isolation, trying to find a place for ourselves in a bustling, sometimes boisterous fellowship is not always easy. We may still feel isolated, focusing on our differences rather than our similarities.

What Is Dry Drunk Syndrome?

Many know the answer to the question “what is dry drunk syndrome?”, but sometimes the family members or close loved ones do not.
So what is dry drunk syndrome? It is when an alcoholic is not drinking, yet they are still exhibiting the same behaviors they did while drinking. For example, a dry drunk can be someone who is a violent person while drinking, but remains violent even after the drink has been removed. Though the alcohol has been removed,the family is still experiencing chaos, if not even more so than before.

The Brain Chemistry Of Overcoming Addiction

The Holy Grail of addiction science is to fully understand the neurological structures and processes that cause addiction and shape addicts’ behavior.
Traditionally, this task was left to psychology, which laid down the core theories based on the symptoms displayed and the behavior exhibited. This is analogous to determining the likely issue with a malfunctioning car based on the sounds emitted from the engine or how it reacts when you push the brakes.
Advances in imaging technology — notably through the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) — have enabled scientists to delve deeper into what’s going on inside the brain and develop a robust understanding of the neurology and biochemistry of overcoming addiction.

10 Defeating Attitudes in Early Sobriety and How To Combat Them

Getting sober is one of, if not the hardest thing that us addicts will ever have to do. The journey to long term recovery is a hard one, often bumpy and filled with difficult personal and emotional challenges. Here are some thoughts and belief systems that commonly come up for us amongst early sobriety to be aware of, watch out for, and discard when they creep in!
1. The Non Sober People Are More Fun
Addicts in general, myself included spend our time trying to do WHATEVER we can to “feel good” in the moment.

Suffering and Addiction

We all have tragedies, pain, and suffering in our lives. We can use these as an excuse to use alcohol or drugs. Eventually this can lead to more tragedies, pain and suffering. There are millions of reasons to use. But using drugs and alcohol compromises who you are and who you can be. If you focus on the hurt, you will continue to suffer. If you focus on the lesson, you will continue to grow.

Facing Death

"Often we have to face some type of crisis during our recovery, such as the death of a loved one..."
Basic Text, p. 98
Every life has a beginning and an end. However, when someone we love a great deal reaches the end of their life, we may have a very hard time accepting their sudden, final absence. Our grief may be so powerful that we fear it will completely overwhelm us - but it will not. Our sorrow may hurt more than anything we can remember, but it will pass.
We need not run from the emotions that may arise from the death of a loved one.

The Power of Love

"We begin to see that God's love has been present all the time, just waiting for us to accept it."
Basic Text, p. 46

God's love is the transforming power that drives our recovery. With that love, we find freedom from the hopeless, desperate cycle of using, self-hatred, and more using. With that love, we gain a sense of reason and purpose in our once purposeless lives. With that love, we are given the inner direction and strength we need to begin a new way of life: the NA way.

Praying

Recently my mother was experiencing an anxiety attack. In spite of the fact she takes medications for these, they continue to happen. Not knowing what else to do, I suggested we pray together. My prayers are often inarticulate and cumbersome at best, however she instantly calmed down. It's such a simple thing, yet often praying is our last resort instead of the first. My thought for any skeptics is, what have you got to lose? My husband often shares how he was getting ready to make meth after being clean for 6 years. He prayed for God to take away his cravings, and instantly lost the desire to continue making it. I would hope others wouldn't have to be going through dire straights before turning to God for help, but often that's the only way we discover God's grace and love for us. 

Resistance to Change


"Many of us cling to our fears, doubts, self-loathing, or hatred because there is a certain distorted security in familiar pain. It seems safer to embrace what we know than to let go of it for the unknown."
Basic Text, p. 34
We have often heard it said that "when the pain of remaining the same becomes greater than the pain of changing, we will change" Our fear can keep us from growing, afraid to end relationships, change careers, attend new meetings, begin new friendships, or attempt anything out of the ordinary.

Treating the Addict

In the Philippines drug offenders are "sentenced" to a rehab facility that houses up to 10,000 people. Doesn't this make more sense than incarcerating addicts? I don't know anything about the facility, but I'd like to see addicts get the help they need rather than punished for their disease.